Be your own nutrition expert |

Most people rely on the advice of others for their well being. You may see a celebrity doing a cleanse (like when Kate Hudson did the SCD diet), or hear a doctor say that certain supplements will help you lose weight. But, what do they know? What advice should they be giving you? There are no one size fits all answers to being healthy, as every person’s individual health needs are different.

There will always be those who scoff at the thought of becoming their own nutritionist. They have a hard time leaving the safety of the well-known and accepted nutritional theories. But if anything, these naysayers just don’t want to believe that they can be as healthy as they want to be if they take the time to educate themselves.

The question is not if you can learn a lot about nutrition and health, but more so, can you apply this knowledge to your life? Unfortunately, we can’t ask our grandparents or even our parents (even though they would know) about the proper answers to these questions. We, on the other hand, are constantly reading articles, watching videos and taking pictures to keep up with the latest on what we should be eating, and the consumers of all these “columns” of information are the young, busy, and health-conscious.. Read more about academy of nutrition and dietetics and let us know what you think.

Looking to others to see what works for them might be distracting and take us in the wrong direction.

What is your age?

That’s how many years you’ve been involved in nutrition and exercise.

You know your body and have a history with it. We all have this information; all we have to do is recall it and tap into it. Above all, we must be vigilant and honest in our examination of our history (and habits).

We often simply copy what other people do when it comes to nutrition. While imitating successful people might provide us with knowledge and ideas, it can also lead us astray.

Have you ever tried a strategy that worked for someone else but didn’t work for you?

Looking to others to see what works for them might be distracting and take us in the wrong direction.

Your background

Consider the resources you have at your disposal:

  • You’ve been eating for a long time.
  • Years of experimentation, feedback, and trial and error have gone into this.
  • You know what makes you feel bad and causes you to gain weight.
  • You have a good notion of what’s preventing you from achieving your objectives right now.
  • You already know how you react to food.
  • You know a lot more than you think about what works for you.

If you’ve never achieved actual “nutrition success,” I’ve got some wonderful news for you. At the very least, you’re aware of what doesn’t work for you.

What I’ve discovered

What exactly am I referring to here? Based on my history, below are some of the things I’ve noticed to be essential to me. Although you may see commonalities in your own experience, these are not universal.

I have a hard time adhering to tight dietary guidelines. They don’t lead to long-term success for me.

I’m in trouble whenever I approach exercise or food with a “all-or-none” mentality. It yields no favorable results. It’s frequently a pretext for engaging in another harmful behavior.

I know I need to switch things up when I exhibit behaviors that are comparable to those of other North Americans.

Outside of the gym, I need to stay active in order to keep my body trim and fit.

I do much better – with everything – when I focus on how I feel after eating rather than how food will make me look. Exercise is the same way.

I eat meals and exercise that are beneficial to me. I don’t feel well after eating a lot of soy, so I substitute pinto beans. When I do heavy back squats, my low back hurts, so I switch to front squats.

I know I’m not hungry if I’m not hungry enough to eat a real food like broccoli or lentils.

Here’s a post regarding trigger foods: Good vs. Too Good. Situations are even more essential to me than eating. I’ll be OK if you sit me down to a wonderful supper with friends and family. If you lock me in a cold, dark room on a mid-December evening, I’m more likely to go on a processed food binge. Worse worse, I may have to rely on “willpower.” I’m not a fan of willpower.

I need a reason other than my appearance to eat the way I do every day. Being able to focus my eating habits on helping the environment, animals, and my own health is a great motivator for me. I become concerned and selfish when I get too caught up in how food makes me appear.

When I eat late at night, I usually don’t get enough sleep and wake up with less energy.

I concentrate on eating healthy foods that taste nice and make me feel well. When I eat enough nutritious foods, my appetite for non-nutritive foods decreases dramatically.

I don’t like to eat more than four or five times a day. If I eat more than that, my entire day becomes consumed by food, which is not healthy for me.

When my daily eating habits aren’t working out, whether it’s because I’m eating too much, too little, obsessing over food, or eating a lot of non-nutritious food, the issue is never with food or eating. The issue concerns my personal life. Something in my life is out of whack, and it’s showing up in my eating habits.

Observing hunger cues is crucial for me to keep a trim body. This takes precedence over specific foods or nutrient timing techniques. Bad things happen when I eat past fullness, regardless of the meal. I look the same and feel the same. I’m set when I acknowledge my body and tune in.

It doesn’t work for me to eat while doing other things. I can’t read and eat at the same time. I can’t eat and watch TV at the same time. I can’t drive and eat at the same time. When I do, I eat too much, don’t listen to my body, and treat food with disrespect. I eat when it’s time to eat. That is all there is to it. One of my favorite quotations is this:

“Eating in a car is like making love in a car: it’s uncomfortable, untidy, and you won’t respect yourself in the morning.” Victoria Moran is an author.

Do you see where I’m going with this?

This is the kind of information we can glean from recalling our eating habits. We can figure out what works best for us. We don’t learn them from a textbook; we learn them from years of personal experience. And, most significantly, they are almost certainly unique to each of us.

So, what have you discovered? What has proven to be effective for you? What doesn’t work?

Use it.

 

 

 

 

 

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Frequently Asked Questions

How do I become a nutritionist expert?

Nutrition is one of the most heavily studied topics in the world. There is always more to learn, but you can start by taking courses and reading books on the subject. Q: How do I become a computer programmer? Computer programming is a skill that requires a lot of time and

Can you be your own nutritionist?

Although you need to watch what you eat, it is not always possible to eat well every day. If you eat poorly or not enough, its better to see a nutritionist than to try to eat well on your own. Q: How to make coconut flour pancakes? The

How much does it cost to become a nutrition coach?

It depends on the type of certification you get. The certification is $2000, and then you have to take a test thats $200. To get a proper certification, youll have to study and take the class. Q: What is a good aldohexose? A

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